Categories
Posts

Repurposed Interdisciplinary Conference

It was great to have the opportunity to present at the REPURPOSED: Reclaiming Past Objects, Knowledge, and Narratives Interdisciplinary Conference.

If you missed it here is my presentation.

Repurposing Tom Thumb: An Early Modern Arthurian Hero

The story of medieval folk character Tom Thumb, a man of mystical birth, no larger than his father’s thumb, continues to appear in popular culture today. However, what is unfamiliar too many, is his transition from a mystical curiosity to an established knight of the round table. Richard Johnson’s 1621 chapbook, The History of Tom Thumbe, was the first fairy-tale to be published in English and established Tom within the Arthurian world. However, this was not the origin of Tom’s story.

Tom Thumb was a popular transnational figure of oral lore who also appeared in numerous English texts such as Reginald Scot’s Discovery of Witchcraft in 1584 and Thomas Nashe’s 1592, Pierce Penniless. The induction of this improbable fantastical medieval folk character into the Arthurian world was perceived to be a sign of a decline in the status of King Arthur during the early modern period. Indeed, James Merriman has argued that the addition of Tom Thumb to the Arthurian stable was due to the reputation of King Arthur falling so low during the seventeenth century, that he was ‘relegated to the nursery.’

This paper considers how new and existing characters were added to the malleable fable from as early as the twelfth century, expanding the world and forming the legend into its more recognisable composition. Established figures of folklore such as Tristan and Isolt, and characters from classic mythology like Britomartis were added to the Arthurian world. Therefore, the repurposing of the Tom Thumb tale into Arthurian mythology was a continuation of the traditional development of the legend and not a unique early modern feature representing a decline in the respectability of King Arthur.

Presentation

Categories
Posts

REPURPOSED: Reclaiming Past Objects, Knowledge, and Narratives

I have enjoyed organising and looking forward to presenting at a fantastic virtual interdisciplinary symposium with fellow MRes students at The University of Northumbria, which will go live 9am Tuesday 19th May 2020.

We encourage our visitors to participate in our question and answer session which will be open Tuesday 19th, Wednesday 20th and Thursday 21st within the comment section of each panel page. The presenters will regularly review this forum and answer any question over this three-day period.

We hope you will enjoy the flexible nature of this interdisciplinary conference and we welcome participation from all our visitors.   

PLEASE REGISTER FOR THE EVENT AS PRESENTATIONS WILL ONLY BE ACCESSIBLE TO REGISTERED GUESTS.

Programme

For more information check out www.re-purposed.com

Categories
Posts

The Arthurian Reformation

My undergraduate dissertation, The Arthurian Reformation: The Changing Image of the Arthurian Legend During the English Reformation (Newcastle: The University of Northumbria at Newcastle, 2019), is now available via The University of Northumbria’s Dissertation Repository site.

Categories
Posts

NORTHUMBRIA HISTORY DISSERTATION REPOSITORY EVENT 2019

Northumbria History Dissertation Repository Event 2019 Speakers: Adam, Michaela, Lily, Lewis, Jyoti and Aaron.

It was great to talk to Northumbria History’s final year students about my dissertation work and experience.

The Northumbria Dissertation Repository was launched in October 2015 to share the best of the university’s undergraduate research in History. While online repositories already exist for postgraduate theses, few include undergraduate research – despite the fact that many dissertations are original in conception, argument, and in their use of primary sources.

Northumbria History Dissertation Repository
Categories
Posts

Sex and Gender Politics: Medieval and Early Modern Studies Symposium

I thoroughly enjoyed the very interesting Sex and Gender Politics: Medieval and Early Modern Studies Symposium at Northumbria University and my complements to all of the speakers and organisers.

This one-day event was hosted by the Medieval and Early Modern Studies research group at Northumbria University, Newcastle, brought together academics, early career researchers, and PhD students for an interdisciplinary symposium linking new and more traditional approaches to medieval and early modern gender studies broadly defined.

Keynote speaker: Dr Elena Woodacre (University of Winchester), author of The Queens Regnant of Navarre: Succession, Politics and Partnership, 1274-1512, lead editor of the Routledge History of Monarchy, and founder of the Royal Studies Network

Categories
Posts

Royal Historical Society/ History Today Prize

I am very pleased to have been nominated for the Royal Historical Society/ History Today Prize. I would like to thank all at Northumbria University for helping me achieve this huge honour.

#northumbriauniversity

Categories
Posts

Graduating

I am delighted to be graduating with a First Class degree in History from the University of Northumbria at Newcastle. Not only that, but being awarded the Faculty Prize for Best Undergraduate Student in the History Subject Area is an honour.